Miller Huggins: Baseball Career, Manager & Death

Peter Strople famously said, “Legacy is not leaving something for people. It’s leaving something in people.” This particular quote resonates perfectly with the life and legacy of Miller Huggins.   

Miller Huggins, or Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879), was an American professional baseball player and manager. He is also a Hall of Famer who has led the New York Yankees to their first six American League pennants and three world championships.

Miller Huggins
Miller Huggins

Having won many trophies and awards, Huggins was a fighter on and off the pitch. Despite his small height. Huggins never felt down or gave up. Moreover, he has managed famous baseball player Babe Ruth

Before going into the exciting details of Miller’s life, let’s look at some quick facts about him. 

Quick Facts

Full NameMiller James Huggins
Birth Date March 27, 1878
Birth PlaceCincinnati, Ohio
NicknameRabbit, Little Everywhere, Mighty Mite
NationalityAmerican
ReligionChristianity
EthnicityWhite
EducationWoodward High School, Walnut Hills School, University of Cincinnati
Father’s NameJames T.
Mother’s NameSarah Huggins
SiblingsTwo brothers, One Sister
WifeNo
SonNone
ProfessionBaseball Player
Height(approx.)5’6″
Weight(approx.)140 lb
Hair colorHair
Eye colorLight Brown
HoroscopeLibra
TeamsAs a player: Cincinnati Reds, St.Louis Cardinals
As a manager: St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees
DebutJune 27, 2019, for the Houston Astros
Social MediaNo
Net Worth$1.5 Million
Awards & Recognitions3x World Series Champion (1923, 1927, 1928)
Monument Park honoree
Baseball Hall of Fame (1964)
MerchBaseball Card (New York Yankees), Autograph
Last UpdateJune, 2022

Miller Huggins | Early Life, Education & Family

Miller James Huggins was born in Cinncinati, Ohio, to his parents, James T. and Sarah Huggins. Although he was born in America, both of his parents were born in England. 

Likewise, Huggins’ father was an Englishman who worked as a grocer. At the same time, his mother was a local from Cincinnati.

He had three siblings altogether; one sister and three brothers. Also, he was the youngest among his brothers. 

The Huggins were a Christian family. Miller’s father, James, was known as a devout Methodist. Initially, he had objections regarding his son playing baseball. Nevertheless, Miller grew up in a Christian household with a Christian upbringing.

Jung-Ho Kang Bio: Baseball Career, Controversies & Net Worth >>

Education

Woodward High School

As a student, Miller attended Woodward High School. The school is located in Cincinnati’s Bond Hill neighborhood, a public high school. 

Walnuts High School

Alongside attending Woodward, Miller also studied at Walnut Hills High School. In Cincinnati, Ohio, the school is a public college-preparatory high school. 

University of Cincinnati

After graduating from high school, Miller went on to study at the University of Cincinnati. The University of Cincinnati is one of America’s oldest institutions and boasts more than 40,000 enrollment per year. 

Miller enrolled to study law. However, his goal also was to play college baseball for the Cincinnati Bearcats baseball team.

As a baseball player for the Bearcats, Miller had already begun impressing his coaches and teammates.

Consequently, he was named the captain of the Bearcats in 1900. However, as Miller was consumed with playing baseball, his law professors questioned his enrollment in the law program. 

Adding more flavor to the drama, Miller’s father objected to his son playing baseball on Sundays. As a result, he played semi-professional baseball under the pseudonym of ‘Proctor.’

Graduation & President William Taft

Huggins graduated with his law degree from the University of Cincinnati. After graduation, he realized that a baseball career was a possibility. Likewise, he also saw financial and monetary incentives as a baseball player. 

However, he was confused about what to do with a law degree in his hand. Due to this, his law professor William Howard Taft advised him to continue playing baseball. William Taft went on to become the 27th U.S President in 1909. 

Despite having permission to practice law, he never continued in his career. Consequently, his entire focus became baseball.  

Miller Huggins | Age, Height, Physical Appearance & Nickname

The baseball pitcher and manager was born on March 27, 1879. As a result, his zodiac sign is Aries. Miller Huggins died on September 20, 1929, at the age of 50. He died due to influenza and a high fever.

Height & Physical Appearance

Likewise, Huggins is 5 feet and 5 inches tall. He weighed 140 lbs when he was alive. Many people considered Huggin’s size and physique to be too small for the sport.

However, Huggins defied all odds and worked hard on his physique, and finessed his field skills.

Nickname

Huggins received many nicknames in his playing career. The most famous nicknames are ‘Mighty Mite,’ ‘Mite Manager,’ ‘Rabbit,’ and ‘Little Everywhere.’ 

He was nicknamed ‘Mighty Mite’ and ‘Mite Manager’ due to his small stature. Likewise, he received the nickname ‘Rabbit’ and ‘Little Everywhere’ due to his ability to cover ground in the infield. 

Top 6 Bobby Jones Quotes >>

Miller Huggins | Career

Playing Style

Huggins began his career as a right-handed batsman. However, he struggled to put in competitive performances as a right-handed batsman. As a result, he switched to bat from the left side in 1902. 

Huggins initially began his playing career semi-professionally under the pseudonym of ‘Proctor.’ In 1898, he played for the Cincinnati Shamrocks, which Julius Fleischmann managed.

Likewise, Huggins also played for another semi-professional team managed by Julius Fleischmann. He played for the Mountain Tourists, who were a team based in the Catskill Mountains. He had a batting average of .400 with them. 

Early Career- First Steps

Miller Huggins debuted professionally in Minor League Baseball. He played for the Mansfield Haymakers of the Class B Interstate League in 1899. Similarly, from 1901 to 1903, he played for another Minor league team named St. Paul Saints. 

Julius Fleischmann kept tabs on Huggins during his time at St. Paul. Finally, Fleischmann, who co-owns the Cincinnati Reds, decided to purchase Huggins’ contract before the 1904 season. 

The player made his debut for the National League team on April 15, 1904. 

Just before the 1910 season, Cincinnati Reds traded Miller and Frank Corridon, and Rebel Oakes to St.Louis Cardinals. Huggins played impressively for the Cardinals as he made 803 appearances and 3427 plate appearances. 

In the 1910-11 season, Miller batted for .265 and led the Cardinals. 

Career Stats

YearWARABHHRBARRBISB
Career35.4555814749.265948318324

Player-Manager 

Huggins continued gaining respect and fame through his playing style and understanding of the game. As a result, the Cardinals made him the player-manager after the 1912 season. He succeeded Roger Bresnahan. 

St.Louis Cardinals’ owner Helene Hathaway Britton decided to promote Huggins due to his ‘gentlemanly’ personality. In contrast, she disliked the previous manager, Roger’s rougher personality. 

Managerial Record

YearGWLTW-L%
Career25701413113423.555

Time with New York Yankees

The New York Yankees struggled during the period between 1910 and 1920. As a result, Yankees owner Jacob Rupert and Tillinghast Huston sought the services of Miller Huggins. 

Huggin signed a two-year contract with the Yankees and became the manager in 1918. Manager Huggins then went on to bring his ideas to the team and made plenty of changes. He began by drilling the idea of fundamental baseball to the team. 

Huggins, New York Yankees
Huggins in his New York Yankees jersey

Huggin’s first season with the Yankees saw them finish fourth in the American League. The manager went on to sign many players according to his preference. Ultimately, he continued preparing the team to win the championship.

Babe Ruth & Miller Huggins 

However, Huggins didn’t have an easy time as a manager. Besides that, his managerial career wasn’t without any controversy. He received constant criticisms from some of his players and the press.

What makes it worse is that owner Huston would often side with the players when an argument ensued between the players and Huggins. Likewise, Huggins often clashed with popular baseball player Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth is a popular figure in the world of baseball. However, his popularity came with a lot of issues. As a player, Ruth declined and resisted Huggin’s discipline frequently. Furthermore, he didn’t respect his manager and often became a rebel. 

Miller Huggins and Babe Ruth.

Similarly, Babe Ruth disapproved of Huggins as he saw that his manager was of small stature, soft-spoken, and unable to fight. Ruth’s disrespectful attitude and lack of support from the owners made life hard for Huggins.

Period of Success

Despite the tumultuous relationship shared by Huggins with the owners and players, things slowly improved. Owner Rupert became supportive of Huggins’s ideas and stance in all circumstances. 

Huggins successfully led the New York Yankees to their first American League pennant in 1921. As champions, the Yankees qualified for the World Series Championships 1921. However, they lost to the New York Giants and became runners-up. 

Similarly, in 1922 manager Huggins successfully led the Yankees to their second AL pennant. But, unfortunately, they lost once again in the World Championships. 

In 1923, Miller led the New York Yankees to their first-ever World Series Championship.  

More success and World Series Champions

Miller Huggins continued working hard with the team. Also, he became much more respected than before. Likewise, the owners greatly valued and admired his services to the team. 

From 1926 to 1928, Miller led the team to win the AL pennant thrice. Similarly, he also successfully led the team to World Series Championships Victories in 1927 and 1928.  

In 1927, the Yankees defeated Pittsburgh Pirates 4-0 to win the Championship. In 1928, the Yankees won the Championship by defeating St.Louis Cardinals by a series score of 4-0. 

Hall of Fame Induction

Previously, the National Baseball Hall of Fame included Huggins in the ballot for Hall of Fame. However, he failed to receive enough votes to win the election.

Nevertheless, in February 1946, Huggins was elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee. Consequently, Huggins became a Hall of Famer in the summer of 1946.

Cy Sneed: Family, Wife, Net Worth & Career >>

Miller Huggins | Cause of Death and Grave Site

During his managerial reign with the Yankees, Huggins fell ill multiple times. Most notably, he became sick and had to be admitted to Saint Vincent’s Catholic Medical Center on September 20, 1929.

Huggins was admitted because of a bacterial infection Erysipelas. From there on, Huggins’ health condition went from bad to worse as he developed influenza and a high fever.

Many efforts were placed to help improve his condition. However, nothing became successful. As a result of his deteriorating health condition, Huggins died at age 50 on September 25, 1929.

The cause of his death was Pyaemia. As a result, the American League canceled all games on September 27, the day of his tribute.

Likewise, Huggins’ death affected his fans and supporter. Many supporters remained tearful at the Yankee stadium.

In remembrance of Huggins’ life, a moment of silence was held before Game 4 of World Series Championship 1929. Furthermore, Huggins was buried in Spring Grove Cemetery in his hometown Cincinnati. 

Miller Huggins | Net Worth & Salary

Miller Huggins was a player and manager for the Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals, and the New York Yankees. Furthermore, Huggins also worked in the real estate industry. 

According to online sources, his net worth is $1.5 million

Miller Huggins | Personal Life

The baseball player from Cincinnati never married anyone. Many rumors were circulating about his relationships. However, there isn’t any confirmation regarding his romantic life. Huggins lived with his sister in Cincinnati.

In addition to playing baseball, he also invested in real estate. Most of Miller’s holdings were in Florida, his winter home. 

Moreover, Miller discontinued his stake in the real estate industry in 1926. This was due to his busy schedule as he was managing the Yankees at the time. 

Huggins as a coach
Huggins as a coach

Furthermore, Huggins is described as a private person who was only open to his closest family and friends. 

Besides playing baseball, he enjoyed playing golf and billiards in his free time. Miller Huggins is portrayed in several movies by stars like Ernie Adams and Joe Ragno.

The most popular movies to portray Miller are as follows:

  • The Pride of the Yankees – 1942
  • The Babe Ruth Story – 1948 
  • The Babe – 1992

Social Media Presence

Unfortunately, there are no profiles through which you can stay up to date with Miller Huggins. However, you can find plenty of pictures, videos, and news about him on Google and YouTube. 

Frequently Asked Questions

When did Miller Huggins die?

On September 20, 1929, Miller Huggins died because of a bacterial infection called Erysipelas.

What team did Miller Huggins play for?

Miller played for Cincinnati Reds and St.Louis Cardinals as a player. Likewise, he managed the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees.

(Make sure to comment down below if any information regarding Miller Huggins is missing.)

Related articles

Comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share article

Trending

Subscribe to our newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.